Reliable Supply by April Yee

A fresh egg has elasticity. A flattened egg has aged. —Bill

Frozen eggs are edible, but you might as well eat shoe leather. —Paul

°

I am, to my knowledge, one person. My fifteen dozen eggs––compulsive purchase of inherited scarcity––are delivered in blue cardboard honeycomb. One, appearing whole, is suctioned in place by a split at the base of its shell. Whites soak the blue when I pry it out. Calcium crunches. Baby blades.

°

Can you FREEZE Eggs? Yes!

  1. Lightly scramble your eggs. 
  2. Add salt or sugar to your eggs. (Don’t skip this part!!)
  3. Freeze your eggs in a muffin tin.
  4. Your eggs are now good.

°

She calls me from a small country of surgeries. The pills: a thousand compressed PMSes. The clinic is clean with low lampshades and truffles cradled in gold trays. The doctor prods her interior for pictures of children not yet named. Slides in a duck bill, cranks like a stranger jacking a flat-tired sedan.

°

Keep your beer in the fridge and your eggs out of it. ––John

Just don’t keep them all in one basket! ––Malcolm

°

I ask her for numbers. She is a math problem in need of a solution. I understand the solution to a dry-mouthed wine is egg. Therefore, the solution to a [dry, aged, flattened] egg is wine. To be technical, a dozen. It is wise to count backwards.

°

She can
give in
or re-
main stead-
fast in
her com-
mitment.
Techno-
logy
alters
her si-
tua-
tion. She
feels re-
quired
to of-
fer a
justi-
fica-
tion.

°

His alter. His give. His require. His needle sucks specks from follicles as she imagines across the ocean a grayed-haired man. I crack eggs on the blade edge of a Tupperware: yellow circles in a syruped sea. Press the lid shut and shake till I can’t see where any one begins.


* Italicized quotes are adapted from The Guardian’s “Nooks and Crannies: Should eggs be stored in the fridge?”; Happy Money Saver’s “Can you FREEZE Eggs?”; and Elizabeth Reis and Samuel Reis‐Dennis’s “Freezing Eggs and Creating Patients: Moral Risks of Commercialized Fertility” in The Hastings Center Report.


April Yee is a writer and translator published in Newsweek, Ambit, and Ploughshares online. A Harvard and Tin House alumna, she reported in more than a dozen countries before moving to London, where she reads for TriQuarterly and mentors for the Refugee Journalism Project at University of the Arts London.